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Tag: Ceylon

25th January, 1936

25th January, 1936

Packed and luggage all away by nine o’clock. Left for ship s.s “Carthage”, at 11:30am and in our cabin “Lala”, our bearer, performs a touching little ceremony when he presents Mac and I with a red rose each and places a rope of beautiful flowers […]

24th January, 1936

24th January, 1936

Visited the Gymkhana Club with Ed. Rose, whilst Mac and Sergeant Milburn went for a swim at Breach Kandy. Edward Rose and Lishman of the Sun Assurance Co. dine with us tonight at the Taj Mahal Hotel.

23rd January, 1936

23rd January, 1936

The “Rawal Pindi” arrived in dock this afternoon and we went down to see the passengers disembark. Very interesting to see passengers of all nationalities and in varied costumes. Called to see Edward Rose of the Atlas Insurance Co. Knew him as a little boy when he lived at Coquet Terrace, Heaton.

22nd January, 1936

22nd January, 1936

A drive round various parts of the city, visiting the Victoria Gardens in which there are a Zoo and Museum. The gardens are well kept and visited by the natives in large numbers. We also went through the various markets and bazaars and found many […]

21st January, 1936

21st January, 1936

Left by launch at 9am for Elephanta Island, seven miles across the bay. Got news that there was little hope for the King and our return saw the flags flying at half mast. This was at 12:30pm, or 7am English time, and on landing we […]

20th January, 1936

20th January, 1936

Went with Mac to Breach Kandy – a fine swimming place – one bath under cover and one in the open air with fine gardens surrounding it. Spent a restful two hours watching the swimming and in the afternoon drove to the Towers of Silence, where the Parsees take their dead to be devoured by vultures. We saw the Towers from a distance, owing to the danger of infection, but a model was explained by a guide. They consist of a circular tower, inside which are fixed three grid-like circles, leaving a well in the centre. The larger and outside circle is for the males and the next for the females and the inner circle for the babies. The bodies are placed there and in ten or fifteen minutes only the bone remain – the vultures have done their work. The sun soon turns the bones into powder and the monsoon or heavy rains wash the residue away through a filtration plant. A drive around the residential quarter – magnificent palaces and private residences. What wealth! No unemployment or health insurances here and no domestic servant problem. Afterwards visited the Burning Ghats but they were only preparing the piles of wood.